Integration of Information Literacy into the Curriculum: Constructive Alignment from Theory into Practice

How to Cite

Dahlqvist, C., & Larsson, S. (2016). Integration of Information Literacy into the Curriculum: Constructive Alignment from Theory into Practice. Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education, 8(1). https://doi.org/10.15845/noril.v8i1.239

Abstract

Librarian-teacher cooperation is essential for the integration of information literacy into course syllabi. Therefore, a common theoretical and methodological platform is needed. As librarians at Kristianstad University we have had the opportunity to develop such a platform when teaching information literacy in a basic course for teachers in higher education pedagogy. Information literacy is taught in context with academic writing, distance learning and teaching, and development of course syllabi.

Constructive Alignment in Theory: We used constructive alignment in designing our part of the course. John Biggs’ ideas tell us that assessment tasks (ATs) should be aligned to what is intended to be learned. Intended learning outcomes (ILOs) specify teaching/learning activities (TLAs) based on the content of learning. TLAs should be designed in ways that enable students to construct knowledge from their own experience. The ILOs for the course are to have arguments for the role of information literacy in higher education and ideas of implementing them in TLAs. The content of learning is for example the concept of information literacy, theoretical perspectives and constructive alignment for integration in course syllabi. TLAs are written pre-lecture reflections on the concept of information literacy, used as a starting point for the three-hour seminar. Learning reflections are written afterwards. The AT is to revise a syllabus (preferably using constructive alignment) for a course the teacher is responsible for, where information literacy must be integrated with the other parts and topics of the course.

Constructive Alignment in Practice: Using constructive alignment has taught us that this model serves well as the foundation of the theoretical and methodological platform for librarian-teacher cooperation when integrating information literacy in course syllabi. It contains all important aspects of the integration of information literacy in course syllabi and reflects constructivist and socio-cultural theories.

https://doi.org/10.15845/noril.v8i1.239

Copyright (c) 2016 Claes Dahlqvist, Stina Larsson

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.

The copyright for articles in this journal are retained by the author(s). First publication rights are granted to the journal. By virtue of their apperance in this open access journal, articles are free to be used with proper attribution in educational and other non-commercial settings. Authors also extend to the Editors the right to redistribute their articles via other scholarly resources and bibliographic databases at their discretion. This extension allows the authors' copyrighted content to be included in some databases that are distributed and maintained by for-profit companies.

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 Unported License.

Bergen Open Access Publishing